Alzheimer's/Parkinson's Diseases and Dementias

  • Abuse and the Dementia Patient (2001, 20 minutes) Due to difficult behaviors exhibited by dementia patients, their care presents a significant challenge.  Find out from experienced nursing staff of the Johns Hopkins Bayview Geriatric Center some easy to implement strategies to prevent frustration and potential abuse situations from developing.  Purchase: $150 – VHS (Video Press)
  • The Aging of America: The Alzheimer’s Epidemic (2001, 60 minutes, color) This program explores the types of dementia in the elderly, distinguishing Alzheimer’s disease from other dementias.  It discusses the changes associated with normal aging and considers the impact of dementias on families. Purchase: $259 (Insight Media)
  • The Aging Mind (2000, length not listed) Find out how your mind is affected by the aging process. Learn what you can do to help fight memory loss. We will also take a look at a very serious disease, Alzheimer’s and see how families can help loved ones who are suffering from it. Grades 9-Adult. Purchase: $89.95. (NIMCO)
  • The Aging Mind (1997, 28 minutes) This video explains how to determine whether memory loss is simply the result of age, or whether it is due to depression, vitamin deficiency, or Alzheimer’s disease. It differentiates between normal and pathological aging, stressing that poor health is not the natural result of aging. Purchase: $179 (Insight Media)
  • Alzheimer’s 101: The Basics for Caregiving (1989, 85 minutes) Structured for training professional and family caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s Disease and related disorders. This video includes successful methods that have worked for them and stimulates group discussion and training activities. In addition it presents the interplay of real caregivers working real people with Alzheimer’s. The trainer’s manual provides an easy-to-follow training outline, additional background information and resources and suggestions for introducing activities and essential background information, worksheets and resources to guide learners to further study. This video received an Honorable Mention at the Retirement Research Foundation’s National Media Awards Competition. Purchase: $295. Rental: $55. (Terra Nova Films) OR Purchase: $295.95. Trainer’s Manual: $16.95. Learner’s Guide: $13.95. (NIMCO)
  • Alzheimer’s and Dementia: Caring for the Caregiver (2002, 55 minutes)  The experience of the family members and spouses in this program reflects that of thousands of Alzheimer’s and dementia caregivers who struggle daily with the heartfelt conflict of love and obligation.  This program presents examples of caregivers who have learned to cope effectively with these stresses, restoring balance in their own lives.  The importance of caregiver support groups and other outlets for the discussion of problems is closely examined.  Purchase: $129.95 (VHS or DVD) (Films for the Humanities & Sciences)
  • Alzheimer’s Care Series These important new programs address common but often misunderstood behaviors of patients with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. These behaviors may appear irrational, sometimes violent and often without meaning, yet by employing the effective methods of interaction and intervention presented in this series, caregivers can redirect and defuse these behaviors while keeping patients’ dignity intact. A variety of caregivers share their experiences and thoughts on providing for residents with Alzheimer’s, while providing vivid examples of the techniques and concepts that have worked in their facilities.
    • Wandering: Is It a Problem? (1997, 14 minutes) Experienced caregivers demonstrate compassionate techniques for intervening with patients who wander. Through viewing actual provider-patient interactions, students and staff will learn effective methods of redirecting the wanderer, providing a safe and secure space for residents and avoiding escalation to an agitated state. Purchase: $165 (Fanlight Productions)
    • Resisting Care…Putting Yourself in Their Shoes (1997, 14 minutes) Caregivers need to remember that, when patients resist care, they are often struggling to preserve their own dignity and to understand the confusing world of dementia in which they live. In this video, Alzheimer’s experts outline the best practices for avoiding or reducing the number of situations that lead to resistance and demonstrate the importance of patience and compassion in the care of resistant patients. Purchase: $165 (Fanlight Productions)
    • Agitation…It’s a Sign (1997, 14 minutes) When people with Alzheimer’s become agitated and aggressive, they may be trying to communicate with the world outside their dementia. Lashing out may often be their only recourse for expressing their very real fear and anxiety. Through real-life patient encounters, this video shows appropriate and compassionate techniques that can prevent or diffuse patient’s anxiety, agitation and aggression. Purchase: $165 (Fanlight Productions)
  • Alzheimer's...A Personal Story (1990, 29 minutes) This video shares the personal struggle of three families facing Alzheimer's disease. Through the use of old photographs and footage from family movies, we see in a very personal way the progression of the disease and how it affects both the patient and the family. In each family, while there is a sense of loss and grief, love endures along with good memories of what once was. Rental: $45. Purchase: $145. (Terra Nova Films)
  • Alzheimer’s Disease: The Patient’s Perspective (2005, 15 minutes) Peter Rabins MD, one of the leading experts on Alzheimer disease, presents the patient’s perspective of living in a world of confusion, forgetfulness and fear.  Unsure of who people are and not understanding where they are, it’s not surprising they may become easily agitated.  Comments provided by staff working on an Alzheimer Unit and a family caregiver, further develop this profile of the patient’s perspective.  An excellent tool to develop caregiver empathy and care strategies.  Purchase: $150-DVD (Video Press)
  • Alzheimer’s Disease Do’s and Don’ts (2000, 26 minutes)  Rabins discusses with family caregivers their experiences after a diagnosis of Alzheimer disease.  Excellent for any family learning about the caregiver role and for support groups.  Identifies the do’s and don’ts of interacting with individuals with Alzheimer disease.  Purchase: $150 – DVD (Video Press)
  • The Alzheimer’s Mystery (1999, 48 minutes, color) The diagnosis of celebrities such at Rita Hayworth and Ronald Reagan has brought Alzheimer’s disease out of the closet and into the national spotlight. This program traces the century-long initiative to understand the disease first described by  Alois Alzheimer. Patients in the early stages of Alzheimer’s and family members discuss how they cope with the illness, while medical professionals address the disease’s pathology, research toward a cure and the importance of compassionate healthcare. No longer stigmatized as senile, patients are sympathetically viewed as victims of an insidious disease that is reaching epidemic proportions. Purchase: $129, Rental: $75 Rental Program not available in Canada. (Films for the Humanities & Sciences)
  • Alzheimer's: A Multicultural Perspective (1992, 34 minutes) This video visits four families -- Chinese, Japanese, Latino and Vietnamese -- as they discuss the cultural problems and dilemmas of caring for a relative with Alzheimer's Disease. Language barriers, cultural norms, lack of support and strict adherence to traditions are discussed as obstacles to providing care and receiving assistance in caregiving. Rental: $45. Purchase: $185. (Terra Nova Films)
  • An Alzheimer’s Story (1985, 28 minutes) This documentary provides the rare opportunity of following a family with an Alzheimer’s victim for two years. When we first meet the Jasper family, it is apparent that Anna has difficulty remembering. Her husband, Jack, is horrified to learn that she has Alzheimer’s disease. As she declines, Jack and his daughter Zena are faced with the agonizing task of putting Anna into a nursing home. The story is told without narration. Its power and poignancy lie in the succession of images—the beautiful and strong woman Anna was and the pathetic nursing home resident she became. At the beginning the daughter says to her, “I love you,” and Anna answers with a smile and a kiss. By the end, Anna no longer responds. This film has a special quality because of the intimate relationship established between the filmmakers and the family. The Jaspers open their hearts to us and we share this painful episode of their lives. Purchase: $295. Rental: $55. (Filmakers Library)
  • Alzheimer’s: A True Story (1999, 90 minutes, color) Alzheimer’s is a disease that affects not only the patient, but all who love and care for that person as well. This poignant program allows a rare glimpse into one couple’s experience with the fatal illness that tore their life apart, tracking the mental deterioration of Malcolm Pointon—husband, father, Cambridge professor and gifted pianist, diagnosed at only 51 years of age. The documentary sympathetically yet unflinchingly chronicles Malcolm’s descent into dementia and his wife Barbara’s unyielding commitment to be there “in sickness and in health.” Some content may be objectionable. Purchase: $149. (Films for the Humanities & Sciences)
  • Alzheimer’s: The Tangled Mind (2003, 23 minutes, color) Until now, a diagnosis of this debilitating disease meant uncertainty and despair. Now, thanks to the pioneering efforts of researchers, breakthroughs are being made in treatments that promise hope for patients. In this program, researchers discuss how new drugs, close to approval and old drugs, such as anti-inflammatories, are being used to alleviate symptoms. In one case study, a patient is treated with nerve growth factor. We also meet a doctor who uses an experimental form of CAT scanning to identify people at risk of developing the disease. Purchase: $129, Rental: $75. (Films for the Humanities & Sciences)
  • The Alzheimer Care Kit. A 3 tape series by Peter V. Rabins, MD. This series is designed to give you, the health professional, the family caregiver or care provider in daycare, homecare, or assisted living, the essential information you need to know to provide the best care possible for an individual with dementia, while minimizing your stress through positive care procedures.
    • Signs and Symptoms of Alzheimer Disease (1997, 20 minutes) In this program,  Rabins talks with several individuals at different stages of Alzheimer disease. Symptoms of the disease presented include: loss of memory, mood swings, confusion, impaired cognitive process and loss of physical function. Rental: $100. Purchase: $200.
    • Alzheimer Disease: Responsive Care Plans (1997, 20 minutes) In order to deliver appropriate care to person with a dementing illness, it is important to have a care plan responsive to the individual’s condition.  Rabins helps viewers develop a basic care plan which will minimize frustration for both the patient and the caregiver while maintaining important function and independence. Suggestions include: using repetition as required, cueing, providing necessary prompts, encouraging positive and cooperative behaviors, avoiding catastrophic reactions and developing therapeutic responses. Rental: $100. Purchase: $200.
    • Alzhiemer Disease: Minimizing Care Problems (1997, 20 minutes) Certain behaviors exhibited by a person with Alzheimer disease can make care more difficult if handled inappropriately. In this tape,  Rabins looks at the most difficult behaviors to manage and suggests useful strategies which can reduce caregiver stress, minimize time spent in non-productive interactions and create a better quality of life for the person suffering from dementia. Rental: $100. Purchase $200 or discount price for series of $500. (For all three contact VideoPress)
  • Alzheimer’s Disease (1997, 28 minutes) While there is no cure for Alzheimer’s, there are many ways families who have faced this illness have learned to cope. Through the stories of three families, this outstanding video demonstrates practical strategies for keeping people with Alzheimer’s engaged in life and helping to delay the onset of more severe symptoms. This is an engaging and hopeful program for families and caregivers. From “The Doctor is In” series, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. Purchase: $149. (Fanlight Productions)
  • Alzheimer’s Disease (1997, 28 minutes, color) This specially adapted Phil Donahue program shows the ravages of Alzheimer’s disease.  John Blass, director of Dementia Research at the Burke Rehabilitation Center in White Plains, New York and families coping with the disease provide information and advice on what can be done by and for the patient and the family, by support groups and health-care facilities. Purchase: $89.95. (Films for the Humanities & Sciences)
  • Alzheimer’s Disease: A Family Matter (2000, 30 minutes) This video defines Alzheimer’s Disease and describes how to know if your loved ones suffers from the disease by indicating the symptoms and warning signs of Alzheimer’s. The diagnosis factors are evaluated along with physical exams, lab exams and X-rays. This program encourages the caregiver to be educated in all three stages of Alzheimer’s, so that the caregiver may plan ahead and give the proper care to the patient. Grades 9-Adult. Purchase: $89.95. (NIMCO)
  • Alzheimer’s Disease: How Families Cope (1997, 28 minutes, color) In this program from The Doctor Is In, families who are caregivers provide practical information on how to manage the in-home care of a loved on who has Alzheimer’s. Important decisions, such as whether to use outside day care of in-home health aides, are discussed. Two Alzheimer’s specialists describe the stages of the disease and discuss how caregivers can modify its effects on both the patient and the family. Purchase: $129.95 – VHS or $154.95 – DVD (Films for the Humanities & Sciences) OR Purchase $129 (NIMCO)
  • Alzheimer's Disease: Inside Looking Out (1994, 18 minutes) In this unique video, several individuals in the early stage of Alzheimer's talk about how important it is for them to remain a respected participant in the decisions that affect their lives, from disclosure of diagnosis to planning for end of life choices. Purchase: $145. Rental: $45. (Terra Nova Films & Fanlight Productions)
  • Alzheimer’s: Effects on Patients and Their Families (1991, 19 minutes, color) This program explains what is now known about the mechanisms of Alzheimer’s and what remains unknown. It discusses the use of drugs to prevent the breakdown of acetylcholine and other strategies to preserve memory. The program also shows how Alzheimer’s affects the lives of a patient’s family and what kinds of adult daycare centers and support groups are available. Purchase: $89.95. (Films for the Humanities & Sciences)
  • The Alzheimer’s Mystery (1994, 2000,  48 minutes, color)  This program traces the century-long initiative to understand the disease first described by  Alois Alzheimer.  Patients in the early stages of Alzheimer’s and family members discuss how they cope with the illness, while medical professionals address the disease’s pathology, research toward a cure and the importance of compassionate healthcare.  No longer stigmatized as senile, patients are sympathetically viewed as victims of an insidious disease that is reaching epidemic proportions.  Purchase: $129.95 – VHS or $154.95 – DVD (Films for the Humanities & Sciences)
  • Amanda’s Choice (2001, 48 minutes)  Most victims of Alzheimer’s Disease are over 65.  This film looks at a rare form of the disease, Early Onset Alzheimer’s.  As the story unfolds, Amanda witnesses the rapid decline of her mother who is only 39-years-old.  Although Amanda is still finishing high school, she has a three-year-old son to care for, as well as her mother.  Many of Amanda’s relatives suffered from Alzheimer’s and an aunt was diagnosed with the disease in her thirties.  This film shows the emotional impact of the disease on all members of the family.  Fearing she could meet the same fate within 15-20 years, Amanda faces a wrenching dilemma when offered a genetic test that can conclusively predict her own destiny.  The suspense is palpable.  The documentary also explores new treatments and preventive measures which may offer hope for Alzheimer’s patients in the future.   Purchase: $295,  Rental: $65  (Filmakers Library)
  • Anna’s Story: Fading Memories (2001, 23 minutes, color) At 79, Anna Nelson still lives alone, not far from her daughter, Jamie. But as Alzheimer’s disease begins to set in, how much longer can the fiercely independent Anna be relied on to live safely by herself, with only a daily visit from her daughter? This program follows Jamie as she attends an Alzheimer’s support group, tours residential care facilities and finally sits down with her mother to consider assisted-living options for her final years. A Discovery Channel Production. Purchase: $129 Rental: $75. (Films for the Humanities & Sciences)
  • Behaviors Associated With Dementia: Case Presentations (1988, 28 minutes) This program, shot on location at a nursing home, documents the daily experiences of residents who exhibit difficult behaviors associated with dementia and other conditions. Behaviors include disorientation, confusion, delusions, withdrawal, depression, agitation, hostility and aggression. There is no explanatory narration with this program. Purchase: $300. Rental: $100. (VideoPress)
  • Behavior Management and Support (1991, 18 minutes) This program explores techniques for addressing the unique needs and behaviors of cognitively impaired geriatric patients. It discusses common situations for family and caregivers and examines attitudes toward impaired geriatric patients. Purchase: $199 (Insight Media)
  • Beloved Strangers: Caring for a Loved One with Alzheimer’s Disease (2003, 25 minutes) Four million people in America now suffer from Alzheimer’s Disease and with the aging of the Boomers, the prevalence of Alzheimer’s is expected to double within the next decade.  Caring for an Alzheimer’s patient is one of the most difficult of all caregiving roles.  This video profiles three stories, among them, a young physician and newly-wed in Staten Island and a sandwich-generation family in Arizona.  Learn how to prepare for and live alongside this illness.  Purchase: $125 (Magna Systems)
  • Best Friends (1993, 14 min/20 min—different sources list different running times) Profiles a model volunteer program that provides care for persons with Alzheimer's disease in day care centers and at home. Working one-on-one with Alzheimer's patients, the volunteers provide both respite for the caregiver and safe creative companionship for the person who has Alzheimer's. Warm, touching friendships develop between volunteers and their matching person with Alzheimer's. The volunteers describe how they became involved in the program and how it has changed their lives. The video demonstrates that one-to-one attention can significantly improve the quality of life for persons with memory loss and can prevent most difficult-to-manage behaviors. This video should be seen by families and caregivers, social service and health care providers, volunteers and coordinators of volunteer programs. Purchase: $95. Rental: $45. (Terra Nova Films) OR Purchase: $45.00. (Health Professions Press)
  • Caregiver Stress (1987, 33 minutes) A panel discussion explores the psychobiological and mental health consequences of caring for family members with dementing illness. Discussion includes strategies for stress management, stress reduction, coping with the caregiving role and improving general and mental health for home caregivers. Beverly Baldwin, Ph.D., RN; Karen Kleeman, Ph.D., RN, CS; Georgia Stevens, Ph.D., RN, CS; and Joyce Raisin, Ph.D., RN, MS, CS. Rental: $100. Purchase: $300. (VideoPress)
  • Caring for the Alzheimer's Resident: A Day in the Life of Nancy Moore (1990, 28 minutes) This video depicts an aide caring for persons with Alzheimer's Disease in a special care unit. A subtle but persistent theme throughout the video is the recognition and validation of the critical role of the aide in determining the quality of care. Purchase: $ 59.95. Rental: $25. (Terra Nova Films)
  • Caring...Sharing: The Alzheimer's Caregiver (1987, 38 minutes) By Hal Kirn. Caregivers are the "second victims" of Alzheimer's disease. This video examines what it means to be a caregiver: the frustrations, the fears, the day-to-day loneliness, stress, anger and guilt - but there are also moments of joy. Caregivers sometimes find themselves growing in surprising ways, developing strengths they never knew they had. They become valuable sources of help for one another in support groups, sharing ideas, solving problems and helping each other cope. Featuring a diverse group of caregivers as well as experts on aging, this program vividly illustrates the problems of caring for a patient with Alzheimer's, but it also offers some solutions. Purchase: $195. Rental: $50 per day OR Purchase: $145 (Fanlight Productions)
  • Communicating With Older Adults and People With Dementia (1999, 55 minutes) This program discusses how to augment communication skills with dealing with a client suffering from a hearing deficit or dementia.  It features the commentary of an Alzheimer’s specialist who discusses agnosia, amnesia, aphasia, apraxia and attention deficit.  Purchase: $259 (Insight Media)
  • Complaints of a Dutiful Daughter (1994, 44 minutes) With profound insight and a large dose of levity, this video chronicles the various stages of a mother’s Alzheimer’s disease and the evolution of a daughter’s response to the illness. The desire to cure the incurable—to set right her mother’s confusion and forgetfulness, to temper her mother’s obsessiveness—gives way to an acceptance which is finally liberating for both daughter and mother. Neither depressing nor medical, this video is more than a story about Alzheimer’s and family caregiving. It is ultimately a life affirming exploration of family relations, aging and change, the meaning of memory and love. Rental: $90. Purchase: $275. (Terra Nova Films) OR Purchase VHS/DVD: $275 (Women Make Movies)
  • Creating Moments of Joy (1999, 107 minutes) Featuring Jolene Brackey, a nationally recognized speaker, this 107-minute video shares her vision of how to look beyond the challenges of Alzheimer’s disease and focus more energy on creating positive interchanges in the daily lives of people with dementia. Learn how to create these moments and offer meaningful comfort. Three sequential video segments teach: Understanding the person with Alzheimer’s (28 minutes), Powerful Tools to Create Positive Outcomes (39 minutes) and Memory-Enhanced Environments (40 minutes). Purchase: $120.00. (Health Professions Press)
  • Dealing with Alzheimer's: A Common Sense Approach to Communication (1990, 21 minutes) With this video, caregivers can benefit from proven strategies designed for nursing facilities, adult day centers and families. Helpful verbal and non-verbal communication methods complement diverse techniques for preventing or reducing inappropriate behaviors. Dementia results in many changes- learn to manage and understand them. Purchase: $135. Rental: $45. (Terra Nova Films) A second source: Purchase: $135. Preview: $35. (Health Professions Press)
  • Dealing with Alzheimer's: Facing Difficult Decisions (1992, 20 minutes) This video outlines the process that families might follow as they face difficult decisions when a loved one is in the middle and late stages of Alzheimer's disease. Three different families talk about their decisions regarding care at home versus nursing home care and about decisions regarding hospitalization, medical treatment, resuscitation and tube feeding in the later stages. Purchase: $135. Rental: $45. (Terra Nova Films)
  • Dealing With the Elderly (1992, 30 minutes) Examines in detail, problems encountered with Alzheimer’s disease. This video features two situations: A man with Alzheimer’s wanders away from home and is found at the airport where he is detained by officers who try to identify him. Next an elderly, diabetic woman is inadvertently left in her home with no food to eat. Purchase: $69.95. (NIMCO)
  • Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease: An Overview (1998, 29 minutes) This video provides an overview of the symptoms and indications of Alzheimer’s Disease and considers treatments and interventions.  It reviews key features of Alzheimer’s disease across the continuum of its progression and considers the impact it and other dementia-causing diseases have on the family.  Purchase: $259 (Insight Media)
  • Dementia in the Elderly: What Their Behavior Tells Us
    • Part 1 (1999, 30 minutes, color) This section presents the behavioral symptoms associated with the progression of dementia in elderly patients.  It explores verbal communication problems and possible causes related to the activities of daily living. Purchase: $259 (Insight Media)
    • Part 2 (1999, 30 minutes, color) This section examines the activities of daily living, including bathing, dressing and eating, that are stressful for patients with dementia.  The program stresses the importance of focusing on the individual rather than the task.  Purchase: $259 (Insight Media)
  • Designing the Physical Environment for Persons with Dementia (1987, 22 minutes) This program teaches how a carefully designed physical environment can offer support and help to compensate for deficits of persons with Alzheimer's Disease or related disorder. Developed as part of the Wesley Hall pilot project, the program will be helpful to designers and administrators who are responsible for design decision and to families caring for persons with dementia. User's manual included. Purchase: $110. Rental: $45. (Terra Nova Films)
  • Diagnosis and Treatment of Older Adults (194 minutes) Featuring case studies, this program examines the subtle ways in which older adult rights are potentially violated in mental health practice. It covers the effects of aging; depression, delirium and dementia in the older adult population; administration of the MMSE in a fair manner to older adults; and difficult behaviors of older adult clients. Purchase DVD: $159 (Insight Media)
  • Dress Him While He Walks (1995, 20 minutes) Since it’s rarely possible to change the behaviors of patients who can’t understand or remember, those caring for people with Alzheimer’s must modify their expectations and learn to intervene only when truly necessary. This sensitive and realistic video demonstrates practical ways of dealing with behaviors such as wandering, angry outbursts and delusions. Though designed primarily for nursing home staff, it will be valuable for family caregivers as well. Purchase: $145. Rental: $45. (Terra Nova Films) OR Purchase: $139 (Fanlight Productions)
  • Early Onset Memory Loss: A Conversation with Letty Tennis (1992,22 minutes) This video shows a middle aged woman in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease attempting to cope with the challenges this has brought to her and to her family. The video helps to break down public misconceptions about people with memory-impairing illnesses. Rental: $45. Purchase: $145. (Terra Nova Films)
  • The Focused Program: A Communication Guide for Alzheimer’s Disease (200 minutes) This program presents specific techniques for communicating effectively with people with Alzheimer’s disease.  It looks at the pathology and characteristics of Alzheimer’s disease and covers dementia and depression.  The program stresses the value of interpersonal skills in the care of people with Alzheimer’s disease. Purchase: $199 – DVD or VHS
  • Forget Me Never (1993, 15 minutes) When Diana McGowin got hopelessly lost driving home, she knew something was terribly wrong. Because she was only fifty-two, the doctors did not suspect Alzheimer’s. After three years of tests they concluded she had a rare form called “early onset” which can strike victims in their 30’s. This articulate, high-spirited woman is the first person to chronicle the onset of Alzheimer’s. In her book, Living In the Labyrinth, she writes about her good days and her bad days and the effect of her illness on her children and her husband. Realizing there were others with the same problem, she formed the first early onset Alzheimer’s support group. There she met Richard Badessa, formerly a professor of English who once had an encyclopedic memory. The two of them have become unlikely crusaders, pressing for research , affordable long-term care and most of all, respect. Their friendship has helped them each feel less isolated. Purchase: $175. Rental: $50. (Filmakers Library)
  • Grace (1990, 58 minutes) This unique program follows the life of Grace Kirkland, who suffers from a progressive dementia disorder and the inspirational caregiving efforts of her husband for a period of seven years. At the onset, Grace is seen to be having difficulty with short-term memory. Nonetheless, her enthusiasm for life shines through her troubled moments. Four years later, Grace is no longer able to speak and paces through her home. Two years later Grace is no longer able to walk or eat without assistance. This program is a tribute to the spirit of Grace and the care provided by her husband. Purchase: $200. Rental: $100. (VideoPress)
  • The Guide for Providing Quality of Life for Alzheimer Patients
    • Communicating with the Alzheimer Patient (2003, 20 minutes) Communicating with Alzheimer patients presents many challenges throughout the stages of the disease and as a result these patients are often ignored as people.  In an interactive discussion with staff,  Rabins emphasizes the importance establishing a link to someone who may be feeling withdrawn or seemingly non-responsive.  This tape shows the importance of communication and gives tips on how to enter into the Alzheimer patient’s world and “learn their language.”  It’s well worth the effort, when you observe the difference it makes to their quality of life.  Purchase: $150-DVD (Video Press)
    • Maintaining Independence and Involving the Alzheimer Patient (2003, 20 minutes) In an interactive discussion with staff,  Rabins talks about ways to maximize independence, function and involvement.  Content includes: encouraging independence; developing individualized plans that respond both to the stage of the disease and the previous interests of the individual; avoiding activities that will be frustrating or potentially cause catastrophic reactions; and knowing when to revise plans to meet changing needs of the patient.  Involving Alzheimer patients means knowing them well.  Karen Greene, a nursing assistant sums it up, “Once you find the door, you’ll be amazed at what residents can do and what a difference it makes in their life.” Purchase: $150-DVD (Video Press)
    • Recognizing Pain (2003, 17 minutes) No one should be in pain.  While some residents can help the health care team by describing their pain, in many instances the person with Alzheimer disease can’t.   Rabins helps caregivers identify ways in which they can determine if an individual with Alzheimer disease is experiencing pain.  Again, the key is knowing the residents well.  Change becomes the “call bell” alerting staff to pain. Purchase: $150-DVD (Video Press)
  • Helping People with Dementia in Activities of Daily Living (1986, 22 minutes) This practical video shows both professional and family caregivers how to break down ADLs into simple tasks that people with dementia can perform without direct assistance. Learn how to help these individuals regain control over their lives. User's manual included. Purchase: $109. Rental: $45. (Terra Nova Films or Health Professions Press)
  • Hi Buddy: The Developmentally Delayed Individual with Alzheimer Disease (1998, 19 minutes) This film introduces the viewer to Roger, a 53-year-old man with Down Syndrome and a diagnosis of Alzheimer disease. Observing Roger at home, at work and at a doctor’s appointment, the viewer will note the areas in which Roger is still independent and areas where he now requires assistance. Interviews with his family caregiver, his physician and his work counselor provide essential information for family and professional caregivers working with older individuals with developmental delay and dementing illness. Despite Roger’s decline, he still retains the ability to win over the world with his smile and cheerful nature. Purchase: $150. Rental: $100. (VideoPress)
  • I Know A Song: A Journey With Alzheimer’s Disease (1986, 24 minutes) This artfully made documentary shows that Alzheimer’s disease need not be the end of a loving relationship. Filmmaker Brenda King stood by her mother from her first lapse through her decline. During the six years she cared for her mother at home, Brenda kept an emotional rapport with her, accepting her increasing limitations. She adapted to the changing role of being a “parent” to her mother. Her mother is now in a nursing home, showing great physical and mental decline. Undeterred, Brenda reaches out to her by song and touch. Sometimes she gets a response and sometimes not. But Brenda feels the bond of love continues between them. This upbeat film should be shown to caretakers of Alzheimer’s patients, both professionals and families. Purchase: $125 Rental: $50 (Filmakers Library)
  • In and Out of Time (1991, 14 minutes) In this tender personal account, the film-maker lovingly chronicles her grandmother’s loss of memory due to Alzheimer’s Disease. The film offers a compassionate and encouraging vision of adaptation to aging that will be helpful to family members, caregivers and professionals. Purchase: $150. (Fanlight Productions) OR Purchase: $89. Rental: $50 (New Day Films)
  • In the Moment (22 minutes) Two families deal with the stresses and changes involved in caring for a parent that has Alzheimer's. The Honel family decides to care for their father in their own home and they deal with the profound emotional stresses that accompany that choice. The Hagwoods make use of adult day care and then finally face the need to place their mother in a nursing home. This video raises several issues central to the experience of caring for someone who has Alzheimer's disease and will generate therapeutic discussion amongst those who see it. Purchase: $165. Rental: $45. (Terra Nova Films)
  • In This Very Room (1993, 12 minutes) In 12 minutes, this video clearly demonstrates that Alzheimer's residents can actively participate in many pleasurable and creative activities. It shows them engaged in music, dance, visual art and drama improvisations. These scenes are interspersed with statements by family members that confirm the value of these creative approaches for the Alzheimer's resident. Purchase: $69. Rental: $19. (Terra Nova Films)
  • An Introduction to Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders (2003, 29 minutes) This program provides an overview of Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders to help all healthcare employees gain a better understanding of these diseases and the behaviors they cause.  It also discusses communication strategies for all staff members to incorporate into their daily activities.  Purchase: $259 (Insight Media)
  • A Journey to Dementia’s Inner World of Feelings (1998, 4 volumes, 20 minutes each) As people with dementia lose their powers of reasoning, judgment, perception and language, they often become anxious, bored, frustrated, angry, suspicious and depressed.  This series explains how to understand these behaviors and presents and effective approach to preventing emotionally troubling behavior.  Purchase: $199 (Insight Media)
  • Just for the Summer (1990, 30 minutes) A teenager must come to terms with Alzheimer's disease when his grandmother comes to live with his family. Her mood swings and unpredictable behavior take an emotional toll on him and his parents. Only when Philip finally reminisces with his grandmother does he accept her condition and begin to learn some of the facts of Alzheimer's disease. His frustration and anger give way to compassion and understanding. Purchase: $295. Rental: $55. (Terra Nova Films)
  • Live Long and Prosper: Longevity and High-Tech Medicine (1998, 57 minutes) Since 1900, the average American’s life span has increased by 28 years—a development that brings new challenges for medical technology. This program features an extraordinary sequence in which doctors work against the clock to save an elderly stoke victim. Revolutionary new therapy must be used within three hours or the patient will die. Doctors make it, but with only ten minutes to spare. Another story details an oral surgeon’s struggle with PARKINSON’S disease and the implantation of an electrode in his brain that ameliorates the symptoms. Also profiled are new studies of osteoporosis in women over age 50. Purchase: $149. Rental: $75. (Films for the Humanities & Sciences)
  • Living in a Nightmare (1982, 25 minutes, color) Examines the nature of Alzheimer’s Disease through a presentation of the case histories of two of its victims. Describes the pathology of the disease, particularly the role played by the depletion of acetylcholine in its victims, looks at research into its treatment and explores resources and alternatives for those caring for people with Alzheimer’s Disease. (Penn State Audio Visual Services)
  • Living in Slow Motion: Treating Parkinson’s Disease (1999/2003, 52 minutes, color) Until a cure is found for Parkinson’s, surgical interventions are being developed to improve the quality of life for those bold enough to undergo them. In this compelling glimpse of a debilitating disease, John Kempers chooses a stereotactic pallidotomy—performed on-screen—while Joan Sanders opts for deep brain stimulation. If successfully completed, the operations can provide a lessening of dyskinesia and other symptoms—but failure can mean permanent blindness or paralysis and the pressure rests on both the doctors and the courageous patients to pinpoint the correct location in the brain to be operated on. Purchase: $149 Rental: $75. (Films for the Humanities & Sciences)
  • Living With Alzheimer's: A Partnership in Caring (1990, 19 minutes) An excellent overview of how Alzheimer's affects the caregivers and families of those who have the disease. Viewers learn why it is important in the beginning stages to rule out other disease as the cause of memory loss. Professionals describe the three stages of Alzheimer's and the kinds of caregiving needed by the patient in each stage. Viewers will learn: The progressive effects of the disease; the variability of the disease's effect on different people; the importance of providing care for the caregiver; the importance of addressing legal and financial concerns early; and community resources where assistance can be obtained. Alzheimer's disease often frightens and overwhelms both those with the disease and their caregivers, especially when the disease is newly diagnosed. This video will help to dispel fears and offers calm, reassuring information on helpful supports and services. It should be required viewing for caregivers, families and friends of those who have been newly diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. Purchase: $145. Rental: $45. (Terra Nova Films)
  • Living with Alzheimer Disease—The Family Caregiver’s Guide Physicians, geriatricians, nurses and social workers should definitely make this series available to family members after a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease is made. This series will be helpful both to family caregivers and to family members who visit relatives in long-term care.
    • The Beginning (1998, 20 minutes) Peter Rabins, MD, talks with several individuals caring for families with relatives in the early stage of Alzheimer disease. Topics include: what symptoms indicate the need for an evaluation; what family members should do if Alzheimer’s disease is suspected but the person refuses an evaluation; how to make determinations about a person’s ability to live alone; what options are available to maintain independence as long as possible; how to determine if driving is no longer an option and how this situation should be handled; appropriate caregiver responses to loss of memory, confusion and disorientation associated with the early stage of Alzheimer’s disease; simple environmental modification; designing therapeutic, positive interactions; how to continue “family life”; accepting the diagnosis and going on.
    • The Middle Years (1998, 20 minutes) Peter Rabins, MD, talks with family members caring for relatives during the second stage of Alzheimer’s disease. Topics include: how to manage potentially distressing behaviors—aggression, wandering, memory loss; developing a therapeutic routine for the patient; maximizing independence—minimizing frustration and catastrophic reactions; realizing the implications of memory loss and cognitive impairment; establishing reassuring responses; creating a safe environment; what to do in potentially embarrassing situations; and maintaining family and social life.
    • Endings (1998, 20 minutes) Family members share with Peter Rabins, MD, their experiences during the final years of Alzheimer’s disease. Issues discussed include: what to anticipate, how to manage increased care needs, respite care, important decisions near the end of life and dealing with the ever-increasing loss.
    • The New Relationship (1998, 20 minutes) Alzheimer’s disease changes relationships. A spouse or an adult child may suddenly find a relationship of decades no longer exists. Now a caregiver, the family member may need to assume for the first time a “parental-adult-decision-making” role. The family wage earner may suddenly become the homemaker. And very frequently the caregiver has to assume more than one role. Often people who take on this responsibility may not want to, or may not understand how. The result can be anger, frustration, despair, feelings of hopelessness, feelings of being overwhelmed or feelings of loss. In this program  Peter Rabins talks with family caregivers about the changes they have experienced in their relationships and how they have managed to create new positive roles.
    • The Caregiver’s Options (1998, 20 minutes) After the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease is made, family members need to create a care plan. Not all family members will have the same strengths to contribute to the care of the individual with Alzheimer’s disease, but there is generally something that everyone can contribute. The needs of the person with Alzheimer’s disease will be changing continuously and the family needs to be responsive to these changes. The disease also brings out different behaviors in different people. Some individuals will be forgetful and polite, others will be aggressive and combative. Options considered by the family will often be dependent on the behavior of the individual with Alzheimer’s disease and financial resources. Join several families, as they discuss with  Peter Rabins the options they have explored including: rotating family caregivers, daycare, respite care, foster care, long-term care and home health care.
    • Ethical Issues (1998, 20 minutes) As much as any other disease associated with aging, Alzheimer’s disease raises many ethical questions. Each family will find some decisions comfortable and others difficult. Topics discussed in this tape include: getting an assessment, taking away independent living, the driving dilemma, what to do when the truth is upsetting, advanced directives, making medical decisions, feeding tubes and antibiotics. Purchase: $200 each or $1000 for the series. Rental: $100 each. (VideoPress)
  • Living With Grace (1983, 28 minutes) (Portions of this film are included in the documentary “Grace”) Presents the initial stage of progressive dementing illness including mood swings, loss of memory, catastrophic reactions and confusion. Purchase: $400. Rental: $100. (VideoPress)
  • Looking Beyond Words
    Part 1 (2005/2007, 23 minutes, color) This section teaches viewers how to analyze the behavioral symptoms and messages of people suffering from dementia. It presents a framework for identifying the triggers of behavioral symptoms and explores strategies for refocusing behavior.  Purchase: $259-VHS, $309-DVD, $299- Windows CD-ROM (Insight Media)
    Part 2 (200523 minutes, color) This section details the characteristic cognitive and behavioral impairments of late dementia.  It defines catastrophic reactions, agitation and inappropriate sexual behavior and considers resistance to dressing and bathing.  It teaches viewers how to help patients in a respectful manner.  Purchase: $259-VHS, $309-DVD, $299- Windows CD-Rom (Insight Media)
  • Loose Ends: Aging and Losing Control (1995, 94 minutes) Here is a stark, unpretty, unretouched and deeply touching view inside an institution for the demented elderly. For two months, the film crew lived together with a group of patients who have lost different aspects and varying degrees of what we consider “normalcy.” The result is sometimes uncomfortably close as the film demands that the viewer confront his or her own fears of aging and losing control, accepting the five main characters on their own terms, expanding the sense of what is recognizably warm and human to encompass the often frightening world of these patients. In Dutch with English subtitles. Purchase: $89.95. (Films for the Humanities & Sciences)
  • Losing It All: The Reality of Alzheimer’s Disease (1993, 60 minutes, color) Using case studies of five patients, this documentary reveals how Alzheimer’s Disease affects the daily lives of people who were nurses, pilots, executives and business people. Explains the degenerative effects of Alzheimer’s on the brains and shows how patient, caring family members bring comfort and meaning to those afflicted with the disease. (Penn State Audio Visual Services)
  • Managing and Understanding Behavior Problems in Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders (1990, 2008, a 10 video series,171 Minutes, 84 page manual) This ten part video series and 77 page manual present a comprehensive training program designed to teach institutional and in-home caregivers effective strategies for dealing with Alzheimer's patients. Videos 1&2 overview the causes of dementia. Video 3 introduces a systematic approach for managing behavior problems. Videos 4-9 address specific behavior problems, including: aggression, wandering, language deficits, paranoia and depression. Video 10 examines issues facing professional and family caregivers. Viewers are taught to develop strategies for dealing with problems such as anger, agitation, depression, paranoia, delusions, catastrophic reactions, wandering and inappropriate sexual behavior. Purchase: $295. (Terra Nova Films) OR Purchase: $295. (Health Professions Press)
  • Memory (1999, 57 minutes, color) Memories provide a sense of personal continuity and, to a large extent, define one’s identity. This program investigates issues related to the brain’s fundamental processes of data storage and retrieval, such as why people remember some things and forget others; how Alzheimer’s disease affects the brain and what treatments are being developed to treat it; how aging affects memory; and what steps can be taken to preserve and improve retention. Panelists include experts from Harvard medical School and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the author of the book Searching for Memory. Purchase: $89.95 (VHS) or $114.95 (DVD). (Films for the Humanities & Sciences)
  • Mental Illness and the Older Person (2005, 15 minutes) In this program, Peter Rabins, MD, provides an over view of mental illnesses and related behaviors often observed in the elderly.  These include Alzheimer disease, depression, confusion, delirium, anxiety and paranoia.  Excellent for staff in long-term care and as an introduction for students in nursing, social work and medicine.  Purchase: $150-DVD (Video Press)
  • My Challenge with Alzheimer’s Disease (1995, 16 minutes) Beverly Wheeler was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in her mid-fifties. In this video Beverly talks about the changes that Alzheimer’s has brought to her life, how other people perceive her and how the diagnosis was handled by her employer and the medical profession. She also talks about life and hope, themes that are not usually associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Rental: $45. Purchase: $135. (Terra Nova Films)
  • New Views on Alzheimer’s (1995, 28 minutes, color) Research has uncovered new facts about Alzheimer’s disease and a test has been developed that may be able to predict who will be afflicted. The subjects of this study are 550 elderly Catholic nuns. This specially adapted Phil Donahue program focuses on four of these nuns and on David Snowden, Ph.D., who oversees this study. We also meet David Masur, who developed an Alzheimer’s test and explains how he thinks we can help prevent this disease in our children. Purchase: $89.95. (Films for the Humanities & Sciences)
  • Older Brains, New Connections: A Conversation with Marian Diamond at 73 (2000, 30 minutes) One of the very few people permitted to study Einstein’s brain, Marian Diamond is an eminent neuro-physiologist best known for her work on the effects of enriched environments on the brain development of rats.  Still a full-time professor,  Diamond accessibly shares the newest research on the effects of aging on the brain and the advice she takes (and uses) from it.  Viewers also learn the necessary vocabulary of brain research through  Diamond’s vivid narrative and animated illusions.  Topics included in this video are: basic vocabulary of brain physiology, the myth about universal loss of brain neurons with age is refuted, three ways to maintain brain health and Alzheimer’s Disease is explained and explored.  Purchase: $125. (Davidson Films)
  • Parkinson’s Disease (1987, 19 minutes, color) This program examines the pharmaceutical and surgical treatments of Parkinson’s disease, profiling a 61-year-old author and educator who has struggled for a quarter of a century to control his symptoms. Purchase: $89.95. (Films for the Humanities & Sciences)
  • Parkinson’s Disease: An Update (2000, 28 minutes, color) Parkinson’s Disease currently afflicts one out of every 100 Americans over the age of 60. How do they cope with it? And what new medical insights are being derived from the study of it? This program from The Doctor is In sheds light on both of those questions through interviews with Stanley Fahn, professor of neurology at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center and scientific director of the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation; neurosurgeon David Roberts, of the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center; and Paul Newhouse, director of the clinical neuroscience research unit at the University of Vermont. A Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center Production. Purchase: $129 Rental: $75. (Films for the Humanities & Sciences)
  • Parkinson’s Disease: Current Therapeutic Approach (2003, 57 minutes) This program reviews the signs and symptoms of Parkinson’s disease and discusses the current therapeutic approach to its pharmacological treatment.  It also discusses the most common medication-related side effects and how to manage them effectively.  Purchase: $259-VHS (The Brain and Behavior)
  • The Parkinson’s Enigma (2002, 47 minutes, color)  Using the illness of Michael J. Fox as a springboard, this program theorizes that most Parkinson’s cases are the result not of heredity but of viral attacks and environmental toxins that severely damage the substantia negra, the “gearbox of the brain.”  Fox, Oliver Sacks, neurologists from The Parkinson’s Institute and The University of British Columbia and others share insights drawn from their knowledge of Parkinson’s, encephalitis lethargica, Guam disease and MPTP poisoning that, taken together, make a compelling argument for linking Parkinson’s to neuronal trauma.  Therapies involving neuronal grafting from fetal tissue, retinal pigmented epithelial cell implantation and transplantation of adult stem cells are discussed as well.  Purchase: $149.95 – VHS or $174.95 – DVD (Films for the Humanities & Sciences)
  • A Prescription for Caregivers: Take Care of Yourself (1994, 60 minutes) From a listing of videos on Alzheimer’s disease. Filmed in front of a live audience of caregivers, this presentation is packed with humor and stories from real life. Topics include: heeding resentment as a warning sign of doing too much; the many feelings of anger, resentment, guilt, sadness; options for self-care; figuring out how much care is “enough.” Caregivers and professionals who assist them will find ideas on how to make life better for both the giver and the receiver of care. Rental: $39. Purchase: $89. (Terra Nova Films)
  • Recognizing and Responding to Emotion in Persons with Dementia (1997, 22 minutes) Improve care and reduce unpleasant outbursts by learning to interpret the facial expressions, vocal signs and body language of persons with dementia who can no longer verbally express their likes and dislikes. This training video comes with a facilitator’s guide plus a large poster that provides lasting aid for staff who are responding daily to resident emotions. Purchase: $139.00. (Health Professions Press)
  • The Resident with Dementia: Strategies To Promote Dressing Independence (1990, 20 minutes) This program demonstrates behavioral strategies that promote dressing independence for residents with dementia. Specific strategies caregivers can apply are demonstrated. An instructor’s manual provides suggested utilization. Cornelia Beck, PhD, RN. Rental: $100. Purchase: $300. (VideoPress)
  • The Science of Staying Young: Unlocking the Secrets of Longevity (1996, 22 minutes) New research about how our brains work, about the diseases associated with old age and about nutrition is leading scientists to redefine what it means to grow old. This program examines this research, looking at a study of a new way to prevent the onset of age-related dementia, the effects of the hormone DHEA on aging and at therapy aimed at helping Alzheimer's patients re-activate their memories. Purchase: $99. (Films for the Humanities & Sciences)
  • Solving Bathing Problems in Persons with Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias (1996, 22 minutes) Analyzes real-life bathing situations to demonstrate how flexibility, sensitivity and persuasion can be employed to reduce aggression and agitation. Purchase: $129.00. (Health Professions Press)
  • Someone I Love Has Alzheimer's Disease (1993, 17 minutes) By Lifecycle Productions, hosted by Shelley Fabares. Most of the estimated four million Americans with Alzheimer's are cared for at home, by their families. While the children in these households often take part in caring for their grandparents or other family members, there are few programs available to help them deal with the difficult practical and emotional problems they may experience as a consequence. In this new video we meet several kids, ages seven through fifteen, who talk about what it has been like for them to live and cope with someone who has this confusing disease. Their stories, impressions and advice will help other children, as well as offer insight to their parents and professionals. This is an invaluable educational tool for nursing home administrators, psychologists, social worker, teachers, guidance counselors, nurses and librarians. Purchase: $145. (Fanlight Productions)
  • Someone I Once Knew (1982, 32 minutes, color) Examines the nature of Alzheimer’s Disease. Describes through case histories the painful changes that occur in Alzheimer victims and their families and looks at the state of medical research - at possible causes of the illness and at certain drugs found to be of benefit in treating its symptoms. (Penn State Audio Visual Services)
  • Something Should by Done About Grandma Ruthie (1993, 54 minutes) By Cary Stauffacher. A moving and unsettling portrait of the film maker's family as they struggle to deal with her 85-year-old grandmother's deteriorating mental condition due to Alzheimer's disease. Though still physically healthy, Ruth Hammer no longer can be relied on to bathe and feed herself, or even to remember where and with whom she is. Her children live out of town and a series of compassionate caregivers find themselves unable to deal with her growing disorientation. Yet Ruthie refuses to leave her long-time home and the family must confront the necessity of medicating her against her will and, eventually, of forcibly moving her to a long-term care facility. Purchase: $195. Rental: $50 per day OR Purchase: $145 (Fanlight Productions)
  • Stolen Memories: Alzheimer’s Disease (2002, 44 minutes)  Filmed over ten months, Stolen Memories, follows three people in their fifties who have been recently diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease.  All are married with children and are struggling to  come to terms with an incurable disease usually thought of as an “old people’s disease.”  Roger and Chris were very much in love when Roger was diagnosed at age 57.  Now this formerly extroverted man is isolated at home while Chris works full time to support them both.  She has joined a support group which helps her handle her emotions.  Patricia Hollis had brought up five children and was used to managing a large household when Alzheimer’s struck.  Her husband has now given up his job to share their years together before she declines.  On top of the resulting financial hardships, the drugs Patricia needs are unsubsidized, costing them hundreds of dollars a month.  Michael and Mary have three young children who are having trouble dealing with their father’s failing memory.  Mary must work full time, managing the household and dealing with her husband’s deterioration.   Phil Wood, a geriatric specialist, speaks about the disease and the drug therapy used to slow the disease’s process.  Stolen Memories gives sympathetic portraits of middle-aged couples affected by Alzheimer, while informing about advancements being made in its treatment.  Purchase: $295,  Rental: $65  (Filmakers Library)
  • A Thousand Tomorrows (2003, 30 minutes) One of the rarely discussed effects of Alzheimer’s disease is its impact on intimacy and sexuality. In this outstanding video, spouses of people with Alzheimer’s speak candidly about the blurring of their roles, about changes in behavior that affect intimacy and about the whole range of complicated emotions surrounding their spouses’ illness. We hear from some of the spouses about the changes in their feelings about their own sexuality. A Thousand Tomorrows sets a tone of candor and respect that will help eliminate the difficulty both family members and professionals may have in comfortably discussing this issue. Purchase: $265 (Fanlight Productions) OR . Rental: $55. Purchase: $265. (Terra Nova Films) OR Purchase: $265. Preview: $35. (Health Professions Press)
  • Understanding the Mysteries of Memory (1999, 53 minutes, color) This compelling grogram explores the extraordinary nature of memory through the stories of people who yearn to remember or long to forget. Case studies and interviews with experts, supported by computer graphics, throw light on the mechanics of implicit and explicit memory. The effects of short-term memory damage, trauma-induced amnesia,Alzheimer’s disease and aging are investigated as well. Not available in French-speaking Canada. Purchase: $129, Rental: $75. (Films for the Humanities & Sciences)
  • Voices of Caregiving: Insights From Along the Way. (1994, 30 minutes) Seven caregivers who participated in the Medicare Alzheimer's Project share their stories of caring, while offering insights to others who want to understand or assist caregivers. the poignant stories they share are sometimes painful, sometimes humorous. Rental: $45. Purchase: 165. (Terra Nova Films)
  • What is Dementia (1987, 16 minutes) This tape serves as an introduction to Alzheimer disease and dementia- related illness. A basic overview of symptoms and diagnosis is provided. Lecture: Peter V. Rabins MD. Rental: $100. Purchase: $300. (VideoPress)
  • What is Dementia? (2001, 29 minutes) Defining dementia as the loss of thinking ability and memory, this program explores causes and symptoms.  It differentiates between reversible and irreversible dementia, shows how to document behaviors and considers care at every stage of the disease.  Purchase: $129 (Insight Media)
  • What Shall We Do With Mom and Dad? (1995, 22 minutes) This video presents two real life situations where adult children are wresting with how to best care for an ailing parent. In part one we see a daughter trying to deal with her own sense of loss and obligation for a mother who has Alzheimer's disease and a father who is increasingly unable to care for her. Part two deals with the concerns of a daughter who lives in one state and a 90-year old father who lives alone in another, 2000 miles away. The video and its sensitively written discussion guide focus on helping adult children and aging parents to understand each other's feelings and concerns as they struggle with these difficult and challenging transitions. Purchase: $185. Rental: $55. (Terra Nova Films)
  • When the Mind Fails: A Guide to Alzheimer’s Disease (2004, 59 minutes, color) People with Alzheimer’s disease usually live at home, cared for by family members—who, like the patient, may be feeling uncertain and scared. But authoritative information can help ease the fears and concerns. This program is a step-by-step Alzheimer’s primer for caregivers and patients alike, divided into the following sections: First Signs, Diagnosis, Middle Stages, Getting Organized, Coping, Day to Day, Last Stages and Hope for the Future, a segment highlighting the newest genetic research. A combination of case studies and medical insights, this documentary is a vital tool in coming to terms with Alzheimer’s. Purchase: $129.95 Rental: $75 Rental program not available in Canada. (Films for the Humanities & Sciences)
  • You Must Remember This: Inside Alzheimer’s Disease (1992/1990, 57 minutes) This film introduces us to people in different stages of Alzheimer’s disease, interweaving their experiences with commentary by professionals. John Hooper is in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. He can still read and drive but “doesn’t do things as well as he used to.” As Professor Tony Broe points out, at this stage John’s temporal lobes show signs of change, but not his frontal lobes. Former judge Iris Sweetman who was diagnosed two-and-a-half years ago, still plays tennis but may come to the tennis court inappropriately equipped. She stands in front of her wardrobe but does not know what it is.  Henry Bordaty comments on this type of agnosia. Other cases are more severe, such as Arch Palmer, who no longer recognizes his wife. Fortunately, these people have devoted spouses who care for them at home or at a nearby facility. These caregivers speak for the need for strong community support to bolster their own efforts. Purchase: $295. Rental: $75. (Filmakers Library)