Michael Sullivan Diversity Scholarship Fund

The Michael Sullivan Diversity Scholarship Fund is named after Dr. Michael Sullivan, who served as the Assistant Executive Director for State Advocacy in the American Psychological Association. In this position he managed the Practice Directorate's program of making resources available to 60 affiliated psychological associations in every state and several Canadian provinces and US territories. A fellow of APA, Dr. Sullivan writes regularly about professional practice issues in psychology for Professional Psychology: Research and Practice. This scholarship is in recognition of his ongoing commitment and passion related to issues of multiculturalism and inclusion.
 
Funding for the Michael Sullivan Diversity Scholarship has come from:

  • Dr. Sullivan's staff and volunteer colleagues at the American Psychological Association

  • Many of the State, Provincial and Territorial Psychological Associations

  • Executive Directors and volunteer leaders of State, Provincial and Territorial Psychological Associations

  • The Ohio Health Advocacy Network

  • The Michael Sullivan Diversity Scholarship is funded by generous gifts, grants, contributions and bequests. Your support of this scholarship benefits important research and community projects. You can make a donation online.

Eligibility

Graduate students enrolled full time at a university or college may apply for the scholarship. The student must be in good academic standing and must be making good progress in his/her program. Any graduate student may apply as long as the funds requested go toward the enhancement of issues of diversity and inclusion.

How To Apply

Submission Deadlines:  The call for submissions for the award will go out the preceding autumn. Proposals must be in Microsoft Word or PDF format and follow the template included below. Subject line should include "Michael Sullivan Diversity Scholarship Proposal - [your name]." Send proposals to Michael Ranney.

Research Scope:  The focus of the scholarship is to support graduate level research and training related to diversity and inclusion. Listed below are examples of possible projects in the area of diversity that might be supported by the Michael Sullivan Diversity Scholarship. The list is not all inclusive, but is provided to offer suggestions.

  • Validate emerging methods of assessment, diagnosis, and screening of mental health concerns affecting racially/ethnically diverse individuals

  • Examine and evaluate behavior, lifestyles, health needs, and health disparities of racially/ethnically diverse individuals

  • Study aging issues in adults who are racially/ethnically diverse

  • Explore issues in multicultural counseling

  • Develop a cultural framework for counseling specific populations (i.e., the able-bodied, LBGT, multiracial individuals, etc.)

  • Design a community project which decreases prejudice within a targeted population

  • Implement a culturally sensitive psychological service intervention within an existing group or agency.

Award:  Awards of from $500 to $1,000 per recipient will be granted once a year. Awards will be announced in March each year. Awards are intended to be used to support or assist applicants in covering expenses related to their projects or research.

Winners will be required to provide quarterly updates on the project and write an article about the outcomes. The article may be included in a publication of the Ohio Psychological Association. An evaluation of the project must be submitted to the Chair of the Review Committee following the completion of the project.

Submission Criteria:  Submissions for scholarships from The Michael Sullivan Diversity Scholarship Fund should include the following:

  • Cover letter addressed to Erica Stovall White, Chair of the Review Committee

  • Cover sheet provided below and narrative that addresses the (1) rationale for the study; (2) basic question(s) to be addressed by the study; (3) general methodology; and (4) proposed statistical analyses (if applicable)

  • Budgets should be provided that detail projected income and expenses, showing specifically how the scholarship funds will be used

  • A brief letter of support from a faculty member to the Chair of the Review Committee with the proposal, which addresses the student's ability to carry out the project, the feasibility of the project, and the student's ability to complete the project in a timely manner. The letter should not be a testimonial about the student's knowledge, skills and personal qualities.

Submit proposals electronically to Michael Ranney.

For additional information contact:

The Michael Sullivan Diversity Scholarship Fund Review Committee
c/o Michael Ranney
PSYOHIO
395 East Broad Street, Suite 310
Columbus, OH 43215
Tel: (800) 783-1983

Past Recipients

2014: Two winners out of a competitive field of 20 were selected. 

Calia A. TorresCalia A. Torres of the University of Alabama focused on furthering the understanding of the pain experience and pain management strategies used by Hispanic patients with chronic pain, who are served at the Federally Qualified Health Center in Central Alabama. Her qualitative approach evaluates cultural influences to determine their relationship to pain management disparities among Hispanic patients and seeks to identify potential cultural determinants in the way Hispanics report and manage pain. 

Jeremy J. EgglestonJeremy J. Eggleston of Fordham University examines the concept of post-traumatic growth following diagnosis of HIV/AIDS in minority-identified populations, often facing double stigmas of both ethnic minority status and sexual orientation. These stigmas often create impediments to accessing medical and mental health care. This research will examine the factors that work to promote a personal growth model of adjustment amidst chronic and pervasive levels of social-cultural stigma and shame.

2013: Two winners out of a competitive field of 20 applicants were selected. Ms. Jin Kim's research examines disparities in mental health treatment access, utilization, and outcomes in ethnic minority populations, with a particular emphasis on Asian Americans. This study in particular examines psychosocial barriers and facilitators of help-seeking among Asian American college students who are in psychological distress. The overarching goal is to better understand why underutilization has persisted as a major disparity among Asian Americans, and how to address this problem to close the gap in unmet need. Mr. David Lick's research integrates methods from various disciplines to better understand prejudice against members of stigmatized groups. He is especially interested in how low-level features of the target (e.g., facial features, body shape, body motion) and higher-level features of the perpetrator (e.g., identity threat, intergroup contact) interactively shape prejudice in the early moments of person perception. His upcoming study will test how visual exposure to masculine faces affects evaluative biases against real women who vary in their gendered appearance.

2012:  Two winners out of a competitive field of 23 applicants were selected. Ms. Marisa Franco's research is focused on health outcomes for people of Black/White mixed race heritage. She is investigating the physiological responses to race-related stressors for this under-studied and at-risk group. The study will assess whether racial identification and levels of chronic social invalidation influences physiological stress responses to race-related stressors. Ms. Anahi Collado-Rodriguez is her third year of graduate study. Her research is focused on evaluating a novel depression treatment, Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression (BATD), in Latinos with limited English language proficiency. BATD has demonstrated efficacy but has not been evaluated in Latinos.

2011:  The winner of the 2011 Michael Sullivan Diversity Scholarship is Ana Fernandez, M.A. of Long Island University, Brooklyn Campus. The Sullivan Scholarship Award helped fund Ms. Fernandez's dissertation research titled, "Bilingual Hispanics and Linguistic Cues to Self-Construal." This research is intended to further the understanding of how use of a particular language influences bilingual Latino immigrants' conscious and unconscious sense of self.

2010:  The winner of the 2010 Michael Sullivan Diversity Scholarship was Ariz Rojas, M.A. Ms. Rojas is in the 5th year at the College of Arts and Sciences/University of South Florida (USF). The Sullivan Scholarship Award will help fund Ms. Rojas' dissertation research. Ms. Rojas is in the Doctoral Training Program in Clinical Psychology at USF. She is actively involved in USF's chapter of Psi Chi National Honor Society in Psychology, the University Psychology Association and the USF Psychology Department. Her dissertation is entitled, "The Role of Acculturation in Adolescent Mental Health and Academic Achievement: Mediational Pathways". This research is intended to further the understanding of developmental processes within Hispanic families. This research is clinically relevant with implications for how to help families function better.

2009:   In 2009, Sangetta Parikshak, M.S., was the winner. Ms. Parikshak is in the clinical child psychology doctoral program at the University of Kansas. Ms. Parikshak was a past recipient of the American Psychological Association's Minority Fellowship. Her research involved examining the motivation for academic success in low-income African American youth. This research was conducted in conjunction with Operation Breakthrough, a Kansas City, Missouri community organization that serves 600 low income African American children, ages 1-16.

2008:   The 2008 winner was Janelle Hines, M.A., a Doctoral Candidate in the Department of Psychology at the University of Cincinnati. Ms. Hines research project enlisted youth with sickle cell disease to develop educational materials and programs to inform the community about sickle cell disease and empower youth living with the disease.