The 2016 AP-LS Annual Meeting will be held from March 10-12 at The Westin Peachtree Plaza in Atlanta.

View CE workshop information (PDF, 219KB), also available below.

Conference Registration

March 10-12, 2016 
Atlanta

Registration for the conference is now open. Register here.

Call for Student Volunteers

All positions have been filled.

Program

The program is not yet available. For up-to-date information, please visit the AP-LS membership page.

Student Committee Sponsored Fun Run

Student committee sponsored fun run registration is now open, please submit this form to Kathy Gaskey via email, fax: (910) 933-4018 or mail (American Psychology-Law Society P.O. Box 11488 Southport, N.C. 28461) by Feb. 13, 2016.

Full-Day Preconference Workshops

Full-Day Workshops

(Choose either Workshop A, Workshop B or Workshop C.)

Workshop A: Neuropsychology and Forensic Mental Health Evaluations: Foundations, Practical Applications and Ethical Considerations


Presenters:

  • Beth C. Arredondo, PhD, ABPP-CN, Western State Hospital/Univ. of Virginia School of Medicine
  • Bernice A. Marcopulos, PhD, ABPP-CN, James Madison University/University of Virginia School of Medicine
  • Chriscelyn M. Tussey, PsyD, ABPP-FP, New York School of Medicine & Bellevue Hospital Center

Forensic psychologists frequently encounter individuals with cognitive deficits due to serious mental illness, medical or common neurological concerns (e.g., traumatic brain injury, epilepsy, dementia) and effects of chronic substance abuse, yet the application of neuropsychological principles to forensic assessment is a relatively new and growing area of practice (Heilbrun, Marczyk, DeMatteo, Zillmer, Harris, & Jennings, 2003; Denney, 2008; Larrabee, 2012). The disconnect between neuropsychology and forensic psychology in day-to-day practice often leaves practitioners with questions regarding whether the individual’s reported deficits make sense from a neuropsychological standpoint and how this affects the legal matter (e.g., Peters, van Oorsouw, Kim, Jelicic, & Merckelbach, 2013). This workshop is intended for practicing forensic psychologists with existing expertise in forensic mental health evaluations. The goal is to provide additional knowledge and practical guidance to apply when cognitive concerns arise in forensic evaluations. The presenters will provide instruction on foundations of forensic neuropsychological assessment, cognitive concerns in diagnoses that are frequently the cause for referral (e.g., schizophrenia, traumatic brain injury, dementia, chronic substance use, epilepsy, “amnesia”), the use of performance and symptom validity tests, and legal, practical and ethical considerations.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Obtain foundational knowledge regarding cognitive deficits associated with common diagnoses and the utility of neuropsychology in the criminal forensic setting.
  2. Understand the current state of performance validity and symptom validity testing in neuropsychology and how it relates to forensic practice.
  3. Learn when referral to a neuropsychologist is appropriate and how to formulate appropriate referral questions.
  4. Apply this understanding to practical situations, such as report writing and testimony.
  5. And review relevant case law, practice guidelines and ethical considerations regarding the use of neuropsychology in the criminal forensic setting.

This workshop is at the intermediate level.

Time: 8:30 a.m.-noon and 1-4:30 p.m.

Credits: 7 CE credits

Before Jan. 15, 2016 On or after Jan. 16, 2016
Member $170 $195
Nonmember $225 $250
Student member $80 $90
Student nonmember $105 $115

Workshop B: Testifying and Consulting as an Expert in Eyewitness Identification Cases


Presenters:

  • Karen Newirth, JD, The Innocence Project
  • Barry Scheck, JD, The Innocence Project

Expert testimony on the factors that affect the reliability of eyewitness identifications is an important safeguard against wrongful convictions based on eyewitness misidentification, the leading contributing cause of wrongful convictions, occurring in nearly 75 percent of the 330 exonerations secured through postconviction DNA testing. In its most recent opinion concerning eyewitness identification evidence, the U.S. Supreme Court cited “expert testimony on the hazards of eyewitness identification evidence” as an important safeguard in criminal cases, Perry v. New Hampshire, 132 S Ct 716, 717; 181 L Ed 2d 694 (2012). The court cited with approval the holding of State v. Clopten, 223 P3d 1103, 1113 (Utah 2009), “We expect ... that in cases involving eyewitness identification of strangers or near-strangers, trial courts will routinely admit expert testimony [on the dangers of such evidence].” In the last three years, three of the five states that have historically prohibited expert testimony have reversed those bans. See, e.g., State v. Guilbert, 49 A.3d 705 (Conn. 2012); Commonwealth v. Walker, 92 A.3d 766 (Pa. 2014); State v. Carr, 331 P.3d 544, 690 (Kan. 2014). As a result, expert testimony on factors affecting the reliability of eyewitness identification testimony is permitted in all but two states. As more courts are willing to admit the testimony of qualified experts, defendants seeking to call experts in eyewitness cases are now faced with a new problem: finding experts who are willing and able to testify. This workshop seeks to expand the pool of available experts by providing a one-day training in the basics of expert testimony, including how psychologists can evaluate potential cases, when and how experts can be useful to courts and juries, and ethical considerations.

 Learning Objectives:   

  1. Why expert testimony in eyewitness identification cases is important.
  2. How to evaluate requests for assistance.
  3. The appropriate limits of testimony.
  4. Admissibility standards (Daubert versus Frye) for expert testimony.
  5. Preparing to testify: reviewing case materials, preparing reports and preparing for testimony.
  6. Working with attorneys: expectations, questions and boundaries. 
  7. Understanding direct- and cross-examination. 
  8. Ethical issues in testifying or consulting as an expert in eyewitness identification cases.

This workshop is at the intermediate level. 

Time: 8:30 a.m.-noon and 1-4:30 p.m.

Credits: 7 CE credits

Before Jan. 15, 2016 On or after Jan. 16, 2016
Member $170 $195
Nonmember $225 $250
Student member $80 $90
Student nonmember $105 $115

Workshop C: Forensic Case Formulation and Treatment Planning


Presenter: 

  • Michele Galietta, PhD, John Jay College of Criminal Justice/City University of New York

In recent years, the practice of formulation has garnered increased attention, particularly for the management and treatment of offender populations. Newer versions of structured professional judgments (SPJ) instruments facilitate the development of contextual formulations and potential scenarios in order to assess and manage risk in offender populations. However, linking risk assessment information with appropriate evidence-based interventions requires additional skills. This workshop will focus on teaching participants to utilize risk assessment data in formulations to inform the management and treatment of forensic clients. The workshop will include theoretical information about the process of case formulation, and it’s utility. Current practices and the empirical basis for their use will be highlighted along with controversies about the relevance of particular types of data in formulations. The workshop will include both nomothetic and idiographic aspects of formulations. Although there are multiple variations in theoretical approaches to formulations and treatment plans, this workshop will focus specifically on using SPJ risk data and a behavioral and cognitive-behavioral framework to inform forensic case formulations in order to develop evidence-based treatment plans targeting the most salient treatment targets. Participants will learn the process of behavioral chain analysis to examine past violent behavior as part of relevant data gathering and hypothesis generating. Participants will practice on case vignette materials in order to create a forensic case formulation and treatment plan that incorporates specific evidence-based approaches or techniques. Participants will also practice the process of ongoing evaluation and modification of formulations and treatment plans as treatment progresses.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will learn essential features of forensic case formulations in order to manage and decrease risk in forensic treatment cases.
  2. Participants will be familiar with the prevailing research on the reliability and validity of formulations in forensic practice, as well as suggested best practices for formulation and treatment planning.
  3. Participants will understand the relationship between SPJ concerning violence risk and the use of forensic case formulations, including treatment plans.
  4. Participants will practice formulation and treatment planning using case vignette materials.

This workshop is at the intermediate level.

Time: 8:30 a.m.-noon and 1-4:30 p.m.

Credits: 7 CE credits

Before Jan. 15, 2016 On or after Jan. 16, 2016
Member $170 $195
Nonmember $225 $250
Student member $80 $90
Student nonmember $105 $115

If you would like to register for the workshops only, please email Kathy Gaskey.

Half-Day Preconference Workshops
Workshop D: The Practical Assessment of Civil Capacities: A Guide of Clinicians


Presenter:

  • Eric G. Mart, PhD, ABPP-FP, Private Practice (Portsmouth, N. H.)

As America ages, there has been an ever-increasing need for clinicians who can provide the courts with evaluations of civil competencies and the number of providers has not kept pace. Courts are in need of information from clinicians to help determine a range of issues including individuals’ potential need for guardianship, as well as competency to manage finances, contract, marry, make medical decisions, etc. Increasingly, the competence of individuals to make a will or trust, and the issue of undue influence is being litigated in courts. This workshop is designed to provide clinicians with an understanding of how assessments of civil competencies are performed. A conceptual framework will be provided, along with practical information about the methodology, information gathering techniques and test instruments used in performing such evaluations. Finally, approaches to communicating findings to the court, both in writing and through testimony, will be discussed.

Learning Objectives :

  1. Become knowledgeable about the interplay between relevant legal standards and clinical practice in the assessment of civil competencies.
  2. Describe a standard methodology for assessing civil competencies.
  3. Select appropriate techniques and instruments for conducting such assessments.
  4. Avoid common assessment errors.
  5. Explain the differences between diagnosis and functional assessment.
  6. Communicate assessment findings in a concise, effective manner.

This workshop is at the intermediate level.

Time: 8:30 a.m.-noon

Credits: 3.5 CE credits

Before Jan. 15, 2016 On or after Jan. 16, 2016
Member $170 $195
Nonmember $225 $250
Student member $80 $90
Student nonmember $105 $115

Workshop E: An Emerging Domain for Psychology-Law Professionals: Research, Ethics and Practice in Trial Consulting


Presenter: 

  • Robert J. Cramer, PhD, Old Dominion University, School of Environmental Health Services

Attorneys, as well as social, clinical and forensic psychologists, are among the leading scholars and practitioners in the burgeoning field of trial consulting. The proposed 3.5 hour workshop contains the following content: 

  1. A survey of the various roles trial consultants can offer. These include, but are not limited to, assisting attorneys with case conceptualization and thematic development, expert witness testimony, jury selection, witness preparation, cross-examination design, change of venue survey and focus group/mock trial work. Case examples in areas such as witness preparation and jury selection will be incorporated.
  2. An overview on the existing state of research in trial consulting, with an emphasis on best use of the research to provide the most effective assistance to attorneys and the court. Emphasis is placed on effect sizes in the research, as well as limitations of applying empirical data to individual trials.
  3. A review of ethical perspectives of the American Psychological Association, American Psychology-Law Society and American Society of Trial Consultants will reviewed as they pertain to psychologists and other professionals adopting the role of trial consultant. Emphasis will be placed on issues pertaining to laws/statutes, licensure, competence and navigating ethical-legal decision-making within trial consulting practice.
  4. A summary of training and experience necessary for psychologists and attorneys to serve as a trial consultant will be provided. This section will highlight training resources for aspiring consultants, guidelines for establishing interprofessional communication with attorneys, protocols for educating attorneys, and future directions of training and practice.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Familiar with the domains of practice psychologists can adopt in trial consulting.
  2. Knowledgeable consumers in the evaluation and application of existing research as it applies to trial consulting.
  3. Competent in thinking through ethical and legal issues pertaining to a psychologist’s or other professional’s potential role as a trial consultant.
  4. Able to identify and pursue additional training and experience toward developing competence in the area of trial consulting. 

This workshop is at the beginning level.

Time: 1-4:30 p.m.

Credits: 3.5 CE credits

Before Jan. 15, 2016 On or after Jan. 16, 2016
Member $90 $100
Nonmember $120 $130
Student member $40 $50
Student nonmember $55 $65

If you would like to register for the workshops only, please email Kathy Gaskey.

Hotel

The Westin Peachtree Plaza, Atlanta
210 Peachtree St. NW. Atlanta, GA 30303
Phone: (1)(404) 659-1400

Hotel registration for the 2016 conference is now open. Please book online via the  American Psychology-Law Society.  

Exhibitors and Promotional Opportunities

We invite you to participate in the book exhibit, advertise in the program or conference bags, or sponsor an event at the 2016 annual meeting of the American Psychology-Law Society, at the Westin Peachtree Plaza, Atlanta. We anticipate approximately 900 participants, both domestic and international.

For more details see the exhibitor prospectus (DOC, 36KB). 

Instructions for Presenters and Session Chairs

Information for presenters and session chairs is not yet available. For up-to-date information, please visit the AP-LS membership page.