Feature Article

2015 Winners of APA Div. 5 Awards

Recognizing scholarship and teaching in quantitative and qualitative methods.
Anne Anastasi Dissertation Award

This award, sponsored by the Anne Anastasi Foundation, is presented each year to recognize an outstanding dissertation that was completed within the previous three years and addressed a topic in assessment, evaluation, measurement, statistics or quantitative research methods.

Carel F.W. Peeters, PhDThe 2015 winner is Carel F.W. Peeters, PhD, who completed his dissertation, Bayesian Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analysis: Perspectives on Constrained-Model Selection, in 2012 at the Department of Methodology & Statistics, Utrecht University, the Netherlands. Peeters received an MA in political science (VU University Amsterdam) and an advanced MSc in statistics (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven). Currently he is a postdoctoral researcher in the Statistics for Omics Research Unit at the Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, VU University Medical Center Amsterdam. His recent work focuses on linking the fields of statistical machine learning, psychometrics and cancer genomics. His goal is to bring psychometric knowledge to molecular biostatistics and to convey lessons from high-dimensional statistics to psychometric modeling.


Qualitative Dissertation Award

This award, sponsored by Div. 5, is new for 2015. Going forward, it will be presented each year to recognize an outstanding dissertation that was completed within the previous three years and addressed a topic in qualitative research methods.

The 2015 award is shared by two winners, Shari Goldstein, PhD, and Dusty Johnstone, PhD.

Shari Goldstein, PhDGoldstein received a Master's in counseling psychology from Teachers College, Columbia University, and a PhD in clinical psychology in 2014 from Fielding Graduate University. The title of her dissertation is A Narrative Study of the Relationships Between Women Diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder and Their Therapists. Her clinical training included placements at Bellevue Hospital's Intensive Personality Disorders Program and Brooklyn College's Personal Counseling Center. Goldstein's research interests include the phenomenological exploration of therapy relationship events and their impact on relationship quality and sustainability as well as the use of interpersonal reflexive analysis to find meaning in co-constructed qualitative data.



Dusty Johnstone, PhDJohnstone received a PhD in applied social psychology from the University of Windsor in 2013. Her dissertation is titled Voices From Liminal Spaces: Narratives of Unacknowledged Rape. She is a learning specialist in women's studies at the University of Windsor, where she teaches undergraduate courses on sexual violence prevention and oversees the administration of the Bystander Initiative.






Anne Anastasi Distinguished Early Career Contributions Award

This award, sponsored by the College Board and the Fordham University Graduate School of Education, is presented each year to recognize an individual who, within ten years of completing their dissertation, has made notable contributions in assessment, evaluation, measurement, statistics or quantitative research methods.

Andres De Los Reyes, PhDThe 2015 winner is Andres De Los Reyes, PhD, who received his degree in 2008 from Yale University. He is associate professor of psychology at the University of Maryland at College Park, where he serves as director of the comprehensive assessment and intervention program. His research seeks to improve our understanding of the inconsistent outcomes that commonly arise from multi-informant mental health assessments, with a focus on adolescent social anxiety and family relationships. De Los Reyes's work on these topics has appeared in such journals as Psychological Review, Psychological Bulletin, Annual Review of Clinical Psychology and Journal of Abnormal Psychology. In 2013, he received both the Distinguished Scientific Award for an Early Career Contribution to Psychology from APA and the Early Career Research Contributions Award from the Society for Research in Child Development.

Jacob Cohen Award for Distinguished Contributions to Teaching and Mentoring

This award, sponsored by the Taylor & Francis Group, is presented each year to recognize an individual who has demonstrated excellence in teaching and mentoring within the fields of quantitative and/or qualitative research methods.

John J. McArdle, PhDThe 2015 winner is John J. (Jack) McArdle, PhD, senior professor of psychology at the University of Southern California where he heads the quantitative methods training program. He received his BA from Franklin & Marshall College in 1973 and his PhD from Hofstra University in 1977. After working as an NIH Postdoctoral Fellow with John L. Horn, PhD, at the University of Denver, in 1984 he moved to the University of Virginia to start a quantitative methods program, and in 2005 he moved to USC (with Horn) to do the same.

Among his many accomplishments, McArdle created the RAMpath system for structural equation modeling, dealt with incomplete data in SEM and created new longitudinal approaches to data analysis focused on change. He has written two books, “Longitudinal Data Analysis Using Structural Equation Modeling” and “Applications of Longitudinal Data Analysis Using Structural Equation Modeling” (with J.R. Nesselroade), and edited “Contemporary Issues in Exploratory Data Mining” (with G. Ritschard). McArdle recently received an NIH-MERIT grant from the National Institute on Aging for his work on “Longitudinal and Adaptive Testing of Adult Cognition.” His other research activities include studying the academic skills of college student-athletes.

Samuel J. Messick Distinguished Scientific Contributions Award

This award, sponsored by the Educational Testing Service, is presented each year to honor an individual who has a long history of outstanding scientific contributions in assessment, evaluation, measurement, statistics, or quantitative research methods.

John R. Nesselroade, PhDThe 2015 winner is John R. Nesselroade, PhD, Hugh Scott Hamilton Professor of Psychology emeritus at the University of Virginia. Nesselroade earned his BS degree in mathematics (Marietta College) and MA and PhD degrees in psychology (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), where he worked with Raymond B. Cattell, PhD. Prior to moving to UVA in 1991, Nesselroade spent five years on the faculty of West Virginia University (1967-72) and 19 years at The Pennsylvania State University (1972-91). Since 1981, Nesselroade has been a guest scientist and frequent visitor at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin. Nesselroade is a past-president of American Psychological Association (APA) Div. 20 (Adult Development and Aging) and of the Society of Multivariate Experimental Psychology.  He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, APA, the Association for Psychological Science and the Gerontological Society of America.  In 2006, he won the Gerontological Society's Robert F. Kleemeier Award. Nesselroade has published extensively in both substantive and methodological journals on matters of behavioral and psychological development and change and intraindividual variability, and is currently working on the closer integration of individual level analyses into mainstream behavioral research.