In this Issue

In memoriam: Jacqueline Jarrett Goodnow

An interdisciplinary scholar, Goodnow's contributions to psychology centered on six themes: two-choice learning, thinking, culture and thought, effects of perception, children's drawings and social policy.

By Sarah L. Friedman, PhD

Jacqueline Jarrett Goodnow (Nov. 2, 1924 - June 24, 2014) was a highly accomplished and much admired cognitive and developmental psychologist and a wife and a mother of two children who became accomplished in their own right. She was born in a middle size town in Queensland, Australia, and enrolled at the University of Sidney at the age of 16. She graduated with first-class honors in psychology and a university medal. Since the University of Sydney did not offer PhD programs to women, she traveled to the United States and enrolled at Harvard; she received a PhD from Radcliffe in clinical psychology. Goodnow was an exceptional interdisciplinary scholar, an astute observer of people and situations and was always understated, gracious and unpretentious. Her interactions with others were marked by honesty, integrity and kindness. Goodnow's contributions to psychology centered on six themes: two-choice learning, thinking, culture and thought, effects of perception, children's drawings and social policy. Recognition of Goodnow's work has taken the form of awards for Distinguished Contributions to Research by the Australian Psychological Society (1988), the G. Stanley Hall Award for Distinguished Contributions to Developmental Psychology by the APA Div.7 (Developmental Psychology; 1989) and the Society for Research in Child Development (1997). She was awarded an honorary doctorate from Macquarie University in 1995. Goodnow was a fellow of the Australian Academy of the Social Sciences, the Australian Psychological Society and the American Psychological Association. See a full biography and guestbook .