Home Study Continuing Education Courses

title-veterans

APA approved sponsor The home study courses below are from recordings of previous VA Section webinars. As webinars become available for home study courses, they will be posted on this webpage. This is a membership benefit. Only current Div. 18 members may take these courses and receive course credit. Div. 18 is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Div. 18 maintains responsibility for this program and its content. 

Instructions

  1. View the entire webinar.
  2. Complete the corresponding post-test questions. Pass the post-test with at least a 70 percent score.
  3. Complete the corresponding program and faculty evaluation.
  4. Email the VA section once you have completed the course to ensure timely review of your submissions and CE credit.
  5. Once reviewed by a VA Section representative, you will receive your CE certificate via email.

Available courses

Presented by Bridget Matarazzo, PsyD
Originally presented in March 2020

About the Program

The aim of this webinar is to provide clinicians with the knowledge and skills necessary to work with veterans and their friends and family to facilitate lethal means safety during high-risk periods.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe why it is important to talk to veterans at risk for suicide about their access to lethal means.
  • Identify two strategies for safe storage of firearms.
  • Provide an example of a statement you might have to say to a veteran to initiate a conversation about lethal means safety.

Course Details

Presented by Karl Leukefeld, MSW, and Caron Heigel, PhD
Originally presented in October 2019

About the Program

Incarcerated veterans are a population with a variety of specialized needs. Veterans often deal with both physical and mental health issues stemming from their service in the uniformed forces. As a population, they frequently feel isolated from their peers who have not experienced combat and the realities of service. The bureau strives to meet the needs of justice involved veterans by using a holistic team approach to provide services for and prepare them for reentry. This presentation explores veterans’ issues in the Bureau of Prisons.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the Bureau of Prisons Veteran population.
  • Discuss the programming opportunities available to veterans in Bureau of Prisons custody.

Course Details

Presented by Kathy Hedrick, PhD
Originally presented in April 2019

About the Program

This presentation describes VA’s approach to whole health and its implementation in the VA to date. The program will also review the relationship between whole health clinical care and the role psychologists can play in whole health, as well as the relationship between whole health and complementary and integrative health (CIH).

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the major components of the whole health system.
  • Articulate the relationship between whole health and complementary and integrated health (CIH).
  • Discuss the relationship between whole health clinical care and the role of psychologists.

Course Details

Presented by Mary Beth Shea, PhD
Originally presented in March 2019

About the Program

This presentation describes the three hiring authorities in the Veterans Health Administration and how they compare and contrast. The presentation also outlines the history of efforts to advocate for Title 38 status for psychologists in the VA.

Learning Objectives

  • Explain the three hiring authorities in the Veterans Health Administration.
  • Compare and contrast Hybrid Title 38 and full Title 38 statuses for VA psychologists.
  • Describe the history of advocacy efforts with respect to full Title 38 status for VA psychologists.

Course Details

Presented by Kathleen McNamara, PhD, ABPP
Originally presented in February 2019

About the Program

This program will broaden participants’ perspective on what advocacy looks like, from advocacy at their respective workplaces to state and federal-level advocacy. The program will clarify how to avoid violating regulations, like the HATCH Act, that could jeopardize their jobs as federal employees. Finally, the program will review effective strategies for successful advocacy.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the extent to which federal employees may engage in advocacy, educational activity, and/or political activity when not on duty or in the workplace, including when using social media, with particular reference to the Hatch Act.
  • Explain the parallel between advocacy, which can occur within the VA system, itself, and the elements of advocacy conducted external to the VA (e.g., legislation), including those related to the process and the outcome.
  • Discuss the strategies that can serve as a foundation for those interested in becoming an effective advocate.

Course Details

Presented by John Klocek, PhD
Originally presented in February 2019

About the Program

Finding the time, energy and resources to engage in research amid a busy clinical reality is a significant challenge. However, our training as clinical scientists, scientist-practitioners, practitioner-scientists and practitioner-scholars provides us with the tools to use research to improve our clinical practice and potentially feed that inner researcher that our training programs instilled within us. This seminar discusses ways to engage in process and quality improvement projects at the individual and clinical level that can lead to improvements in daily practice and potentially lead to contributions to the broader literature through more formal research projects via practice-based research networks.

Learning Objectives

  • Explain the differences between a process/quality improvement project and a research project.
  • Use research principles to directly improve clinical practice.
  • Describe a practice-based research network.

Course Details

 

Presented by Zachary Parrett, PsyD 
Originally presented in January 2019

About the Program

This presentation highlights some of the findings from the recent VA National Suicide Data Report, provides an overview of the now suicide risk safety documentation requirements and new suicide safety plan. Strategies for accessing and connecting with community partners to overcome barriers for veterans seeking care are discussed.

Learning Objectives

  • Examine significant data points from the most recent VA National Suicide Data Report, highlighting the most vulnerable veteran populations and comparison of  veteran with non-veteran populations.
  • Describe the new suicide risk safety documentation requirements for veterans at the VA.
  • Utilize the new suicide safety plan as a way to connect/develop treatment goals to to strengthen suicide prevention efforts for veterans.
  • Discuss strategies for accessing and connecting with community agencies, Veterans Service Organizations, and other partners to overcome barriers for veterans seeking care.

Course Details

Presented by Joshua Breitstein, PsyD, and Candy Campbell, MSW, LCSW
Originally presented in November 2018

About the Program

The military emphasizes discipline and hierarchy, prioritizes the group over the individual, and uses specific rituals and symbols to convey important meanings and transitions. This presentation informs those working with veterans about the uniqueness of military culture and navigating the difficult landscape of the diverse veteran population. This presentation’s aim is to provide an informed perspective based on relevant empirical literature of the veteran perspective that will help with treatment planning.

Learning Objectives

  • Recognize the belief systems of military members to help in understanding the coping mechanisms of veterans and active military.
  • Apply awareness of the military landscape and aspects of the experience of military life as it pertains to clinical symptom presentation as well as effective clinical applications and diagnosis.
  •   Describe the impact of military service on military members and families and transition to civilian life for clinical application and treatment planning.

Course Details

Presented by Kristen Perry, PhD, and Amee Epler, PhD
Originally presented in October 2018

About the Program

This presentation provides information on accurate and ethical documentation and coding for common psychotherapy services provided in a VA setting. Topics include selecting a diagnosis or diagnoses, documentation requirements and recommendations, and current procedural terminology (CPT) codes for both face-to-face and non-face-to-face services.

Learning Objectives

  • Utilize accurate CPT coding for common psychotherapy services.
  • Describe ethical considerations related to documentation and coding.

Course Details

Presented by Lisa Kearney, PhD
Originally presented in July 2018

About the Program

This presentation offers strategies and resources for developing successful mentoring relationships.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify methods for setting up a successful mentoring relationship, including implementation of practical logistics, application of useful resources, and
  • Reflect upon successful (and unsuccessful) practices of prior mentors and mentees and how to apply (or avoid) these in your current mentoring relationships.
  • Compare and contrast formal and informal mentoring processes, identifying options for current application in your own settings, no matter how busy you are.

Course Details

Date created: January 2020