In this issue

APA president-elect candidates address Div. 20

Armand Cerbone, Jean Lau Chin, Sandra Shullman and Susan Krauss Whitbourne answer questions about issues relevant to Div. 20

By Armand R. Cerbone, PhD, ABPP, Jean Lau Chin, Sandra L. Shullman, PhD, and Susan Krauss Whitbourne, PhD

Div. 20 posed the same two questions to all five APA presidential candidates. Candidate responses received from Armand Cerbone, Jean Lau Chin, Sandra Shullman and Susan Krauss Whitbourne are below; Steven D. Hollon is also running for the office.

Armand R. Cerbone

We know that information about you and your platform is available online. Is there any place else we can go to find out more information?

My campaign website is also available.

What special emphases of your platform are relevant to research and teaching in adult development and aging or are relevant to policy and practice in clinical psychology?

Nowhere is the relevance of aging and adult development clearer to me than in my clinical practice in Chicago with lesbian/gay/bisexual/transgender (LGBT) clients where the intersection of age and sexual and gender minority stigma manifest very differently. Older gay men worry about care and companionship after the devastations of HIV/AIDS; some experience a second wave of loss, grief and survivor-guilt. Younger LGBT adults worry about possible reversals of rights an older generation fought for. What has been most helpful to my practice and community work with aging LGBT groups is the literature on age-cohort effects, psychosexual developmental tasks and practice guidelines I cite in psychotherapy. I value the contributions of Div. 20 and its members to the effectiveness of practitioners like myself.

My platform is: “Advancing all of psychology to advance all people.”

Implicit in this is a commitment to improve the capacity of every psychologist to promote the welfare of every person. Extending the reach of one branch extends the reach of the tree. APA needs a 25-50-year vision plan that must include the mission and input of Div. 20. My conviction and commitment is borne of more than 40 years in clinical practice, training and policy development at APA.

Jean Lau Chin

We know that information about you and your platform is available online. Is there any place else we can go to find out more information?

Information about me and my platform is also available at my website. You can also go to my Facebook page, my Twitter page and my LinkedIn page.

What special emphases of your platform are relevant to research and teaching in adult development and aging or are relevant to policy and practice in clinical geropsychology?

My platform focuses on leadership for change and an APA for all psychologists with an emphasis on inclusion and diversity of all groups in the populations we serve. As a society with a growing aging population and longer lifespan, we need a cultural shift in our attitudes and practice as to how we address adult development and aging. New issues emerge regularly in health care, retirement, lifestyle and financial resources as people live longer. Technological advances make health and lifestyle choices that were never before possible. Rapid change creates new challenges for our elderly population as they adapt and learn new experiences. When I talk about leadership for change, it is about our ability as a profession and as an association to address these challenges with new initiatives and new outlooks to shape our research, teaching and practice — this must apply to adult development, aging and geropsychology as well. I do take a lifespan and developmental perspective to our science and our practice. We need APA to consider this in how we address the policy and practice issues we face. I created a Let’s Talk Series during my campaign to inform me about the concerns of members with input to the issues we should be addressing. As APA president, I would translate these to action by convening Integrative Forums with the input of a diversity of experts to address the pressing issues. I would seek out the expertise of the division in defining innovative solutions on what psychology can offer to the dialogue.

Sandra L. Shullman

We know that information about you and your platform is available online. Is there any place else we can go to find out more information?

Yes, more information is available on my website, including a description of my background and past experiences, my CV, some links to media where I have acted as an expert resource and some video material where I present my ideas on learning leadership applied to psychology and psychologists. In addition to my website, there are number of other links to recent work on international leadership development and a recent article about psychologists and leadership:

What special emphasis of your platform are relevant to research and teaching in adult development and aging or are relevant to policy and practice in clinical geropsychology?

I view my leadership development work, in part, as an applied adult developmental psychologist, with adult development and aging as intellectual foundations. Leaders regularly struggle with developmental challenges at various stages of their careers, as well as relevance and adaptation to a changing world, including decisions about when and how to retire.

I am interested in the psychology workforce of the future, which will be significantly informed by knowledge of the changing demography of the US population and the growing need for clinical geropsychologists.

The rapidly accelerating digital age will provide new resources to address many social issues in our society, including isolation, depression and access to care, while also creating challenges (e.g., increasing the already existing SES chasm of the digital divide that impacts marginalized populations including older adults).

There is much to be done in educating the public about healthy aging. I am committed to promoting our understanding of healthy aging as a critical prevention strategy for cost reduction and reduced demand in the current healthcare system. I fully support Div. 20’s recent efforts to create an APF fund to build a greatly needed research pipeline for adult development and aging researchers.

Within APA, we have challenges with the changing demographics of our membership and how we address needs of psychologists at various stages of life and career development. There is much we can do to support psychologists who are transitioning to retirement as well as strategies to engage the wisdom of our senior members who have retired.

Susan Krauss Whitbourne

We know that information about you and your platform is available online. Is there any place else we can go to find out more information?

I addressed my “aging initiative” in my platform, as well as in the videos taken at the APA convention, which should be available soon.

What special emphases of your platform are relevant to research and teaching in adult development and aging, or are relevant to policy and practice in clinical geropsychology?

Given my career-long focus on educational issues in adult development and aging, it is clear that I am committed to improving research and teaching within the field. My textbooks and edited volumes in the psychology of aging include materials intended to support new instructors as they develop their own curricular materials. Over the course of my career, I have given numerous workshops and led symposia focused on education, including my most recent participation in the Advancing Your Confidence as an Educator webinar. My popular writing on my Psychology Today blog also addresses issues of ageism as well as topics relevant to healthy aging, and I am frequently quoted in media outlets regarding the latest research in the field.

In addition to my own research on lifespan psychosocial development, including the leadership of a 50-year sequential study of personality, I have served on the editorial boards and as reviewer for our major professional outlets. I held every leadership position on the Executive Committee within Div. 20, having begun when I was just out of graduate school on the Education Committee. Most recently, I have served as Div. 20’s Council representative, where I strongly advocated for the concerns of the division. One of the original CoPGTP members, I was involved in the development of ABPP geropsychology and currently serve as its treasurer. I consider Div. 20 to be my home in psychology and will work to infuse Div. 20’s mission throughout psychology as one of my major presidential initiatives.