March 2018 

Award Winner: 

Jedd P. Alejandro

Poster Title:

“I am God, Give Me a Miracle: Religious Orientation and Coping as Predictors of Psychosocial Outcomes among Chronic Pain Patients”

Abstract:

Jedd Alejandro (right) with second poster author, Abraham G. Reynolds (left) stand in front of their award-winning poster.
Jedd Alejandro (right) with second poster author, Abraham G. Reynolds (left) stand in front of their award-winning poster.
Chronic pain patients use both psychological and religious ways to cope. We analyzed how religious orientation and coping affect depression, anxiety and internal locus of control (ILC) among chronic pain patients. The predictors accounted for 14.1 percent of the variance in depressive symptoms, with religious pleading related to depressive symptoms; 19.2 percent of the variance in anxiety, with pleading related to anxiety and extrinsic-social religious orientation inversely related; and 15.4 percent of the variance in ILC, with extrinsic-social related to ILC and pleading inversely related. Intrinsic and quest orientations, as well as the other religious coping styles were not significant predictors. Although extrinsic orientation may have been historically perceived as immature, results suggest that extrinsic-social may be associated with healthier outcomes and be a protective factor against poor psychosocial outcomes. Religious pleading was predictive of poor outcomes.